Autistic 6th Grader Assaulted by School Cop, Now He is a Convicted Felon

Posted: April 13, 2015 by gamegetterII in Uncategorized

Lynchburg, VA — Nothing wreaks of the police state like police officers assaulting and arresting children at school; especially an 11-year-old boy with autism.

Meet Kayleb Moon-Robinson, a 6th grader at Linkhorne Middle School, whose life has been forever changed thanks to the American police state.

Kayleb’s problems began one day as a teacher was yelling at him for misbehaving. In a fit of anger, Kaleb kicked a trashcan; not a teacher, not another student, a trashcan.

When the school police officer witnessed Kaleb’s attack on the trashcan, instead of getting detention or losing his recess break, Kaleb was arrested. He was then charged with disorderly conduct in juvenile court.

Disturbingly enough, none of the teachers or school officials saw a problem with the use of law enforcement to remedy middle school discipline problems.

Not only did they see nothing wrong with it, but school officials actually used this armed agent of the state as their personal attack dog on this 11-year-old autistic boy.

After the initial charge of disorderly conduct, life for this little boy, who says he loves science, would get worse, much worse.

Only a few weeks later, Kaleb would be accused of breaking another rule. Kaleb, who was treated differently than all of the other students, was forced to remain in the classroom until all of the other students left at the end of each period.

In November, Kaleb left the classroom as the other students left, instead of waiting. The principle then sicked his state-sponsored attack dog on this boy. The school cop approached Kaleb, who might weigh 80 pounds, as if her were a 250 pound hardened criminal.

“He grabbed me and tried to take me to the office,” Kayleb told the Center for Public Integrity. “I started pushing him away. He slammed me down, and then he handcuffed me.”

The incident was witnessed by school officials, and none of them spoke up or tried to stop it.

The Center for Public Integrity reports:

Stacey Doss, Kayleb’s mother and the daughter of a police officer herself, was outraged. Educators stood by, she said, while the cop took her son in handcuffs to juvenile court. The officer filed a second misdemeanor disorderly conduct complaint. And he also submitted another charge, a very grown-up charge for a very small boy: felony assault on a police officer. That charge was filed, Doss said the officer told her, because Kayleb “fought back.”

“I thought in my mind — Kayleb is 11,” Doss said. “He is autistic. He doesn’t fully understand how to differentiate the roles of certain people.”
Comments
  1. Robert Gore says:

    Reblogged this on STRAIGHT LINE LOGIC and commented:
    We have an autistic child and we learned early on that you don’t treat them the way you treat other children (or at least not the way a lot of parents treat their children). Yelling, spanking, harsh language, and so on is completely counterproductive; autistic children do not process these at all and either react, often irrationally and violently, or completely shut down. Either way, it retards the child’s development. Poor Kayleb Doss may be have long-term problems because of his treatment by the school and its security officers. To the dismay of my sister, a strict “spare the rod and spoil the child” parent, we “spoiled” our autistic son by spending a lot of time with him, buying him the few things he wanted, an iPad, iPhone, and laptop, encouraging him in ever thing he tried, and never raising our voices at him. Surprise, surprise, he turns 18 tomorrow, graduates from high school in 2 weeks, will attend an out of state college next fall, worked at a local hamburger shop, and has made friends, including a female. He’s a great kid who has overcome his challenges, which I think a lot of autistic kids have the potential to do if they grow up in an environment of rationality and caring, individualized attention, not the bureaucratic, one-size-fits-all, concentration camps the schools (even many of the private ones) have become.

    Like

  2. Robert Gore says:

    We have an autistic child and we learned early on that you don’t treat them the way you treat other children (or at least not the way a lot of parents treat their children). Yelling, spanking, harsh language, and so on is completely counterproductive; autistic children do not process these at all and either react, often irrationally and violently, or completely shut down. Either way, it retards the child’s development. Poor Kayleb Doss may be have long-term problems because of his treatment by the school and its security officers. To the dismay of my sister, a strict “spare the rod and spoil the child” parent, we “spoiled” our autistic son by spending a lot of time with him, buying him the few things he wanted, an iPad, iPhone, and laptop, encouraging him in ever thing he tried, and never raising our voices at him. Surprise, surprise, he turns 18 tomorrow, graduates from high school in 2 weeks, will attend an out of state college next fall, worked at a local hamburger shop, and has made friends, including a female. He’s a great kid who has overcome his challenges, which I think a lot of autistic kids have the potential to do if they grow up in an environment of rationality and caring, individualized attention, not the bureaucratic, one-size-fits-all, concentration camps the schools (even many of the private ones) have become.

    Like

    • gamegetterII says:

      Congrats on being able to spend the time with your autistic child as you were raising him and that spending the time led to him be able to overcome the challenges as he was growing up.
      I have a friend with an autistic child,he moved from Ohio to the suburbs of Tampa for chis job,the state of Florida apparently does a lot for autistic kids,even have a program where you an donate when you get your license plates.
      Like you,they spent lots of time with their kid,and he is doing good so far-he’s got another year of high school to go.He was a genius as far as I’m concerned-he could take apart and repair laptops-even mine that I had at work,and dropped down flights of unfinished stairs when I was still working framing houses. (that field of employment came to a sudden stop in ’08)
      Thanks for the re-blog !

      Like

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