Modern War: The Decade of the Mercenary

Posted: May 20, 2016 by gamegetterII in Uncategorized

The Tactical Hermit

TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY W.G. DUNLOP Iraqi soldiers receive training by foreign contractors in the Besmaya military base in southern Baghdad on April 24, 2012. The Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq (OSC-I), a group of 157 military personnel under US embassy authority, supported by some 600 civilian contractors, is working with the Iraqi military on everything from training on new equipment to military education. AFP PHOTO/AHMAD AL-RUBAYE (Photo credit should read AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/GettyImages)

Contrary to popular belief, Mercenaries are the “Silent Majority” in Obama’s Military, and the president’s “light footprint” approach to war has relied on thousands of Americans paid to fight — and die — in the shadows.

Last weekend, the New York Timespublished one of what will be many takes on President Barack Obama’s legacy as commander in chief. Retroactively shoehorning seven-plus years of varied military operations into one coherent “doctrine” is impossible, but dozens of articles will soon attempt to do so.

There is one significant aspect of this doctrine, however, that is rarely mentioned by the media and never by Obama: the unprecedented use of private contractors to support foreign military operations.

Obama has authorized the continuation or re-emergence of two of the most contractor-dependent wars (or “overseas contingency operations” in Pentagon-speak) in U.S. history. As noted previously, there are roughly three contractors (28,626) for every…

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