Michigan Coyotes Take Down Horse

Posted: January 29, 2015 by gamegetterII in hunting
Tags: , , ,

And people think I’m making the shit up about coyotes killing adult deer,and being the reason for decline in deer herd numbers in multiple states…

The Lapeer County, Michigan Sheriff’s Mounted Unit announced on Sunday that one of their horses died as a result of a predatory coyote attack over the weekend. The horse’s owner, Lapeer County Sheriff Deputy Kallie Meyers, had been keeping the animal in a paddock near a barn on her property. On Sunday afternoon, a pack of five to six coyotes charged onto Meyers’ property and managed to bring the mare down before the owners were able to intervene by releasing their dogs on the predators.

Meyers’ dogs were eventually able to chase the pack off the property, but the horse’s injuries from the attack were too severe and it had to be put down.

“They came in the yard to get our horse,” Bruce Meyers wrote on Facebook. “Within 70 feet of the house. Our dogs went to help, managed to chase them off but one dog is chewed up, others have only a few scratches and minor punctures.”

It was not the first time that the predators have encroached upon the Meyers’ farm in Oxford Township. Kallie Meyers explained that coyotes have killed several farm animals on her property in the past.

Reports of coyotes attacking large animals in broad daylight are troubling to biologists. Coyotes are known for being shy around humans, and usually limit their hunts to smaller animals at night. In Michigan, it is legal to shoot or trap coyotes year-round on private property and there is no bag limit during regular seasons. Wildlife experts noted that humans and larger animals usually have very little to fear from coyotes.

Read the rest @  http://www.outdoorhub.com/news/2015/01/28/michigan-sheriff-deputys-horse-put-following-coyote-attack/

“Reports of coyotes attacking large animals in broad daylight are troubling to biologists.”

Really? The same biologists who have done studies that confirm eastern coyotes have a considerable amount of wolf DNA are now finding it “troubling” that packs of ‘yotes are killing large animals? I wonder how “troubling” they are going to find it when the population of our deer herds crash? Or when the first young child is attacked by a pack of ‘yotes?
I’ve made multiple posts asking deer hunters
to start shooting yotes,and letting them know that they will see fewer and fewer deer until the ‘yote population is seriously reduced. The only good thing I’ve noticed since the ‘yote population exploded in NE Ohio is that the feral cat population had been reducedwhich is a plus-as NE Ohio deer have been found to be carrying the organism that causes toxoplasmosis-which can ONLY be spread by cat feces,less cat shit in the woods is always a plus,along with less of a chance of getting toxoplasmosis.
Since the wildlife biologists and the DNR/state fish and game agencies
in Michigan,Ohio,Illinois,Indiana,Pa,and W.Va. don’t seem to believe that the ‘yotes are the reason for the decline in deer numbers,and do not seem to believe that ‘yotes are killing up to 7 out of every 10 fawns in many areas-it’s up to deer hunters to get the ‘yote population under control.

Most states have either no limit or very liberal limits on the number of ‘yotes you can shoot.

Fur prices are up this year,so you can more than cover your expenses-including ammo,food and gas.

The fewer ‘yotes there are in May-the more fawns that survive-now’s the time to start reducing the ‘yote population-the state fish and game agencies ain’t gonna help do it-so anyone who wants to see the deer numbers stop the decline-get out there and start takin out ‘yotes-as many as possible.

Comments
  1. gamegetterII says:

    Experts surprised by which predator is No. 1 killer of deer in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

    But what researchers found this past winter, the third year of a western U.P. deer mortality study, is that coyotes were the No. 1 predator followed by bobcats. Wolves came in fourth after a three-way tie among hunters, unknown predators and undetermined causes.

    http://www.mlive.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2012/04/experts_surprised_by_which_pre.html

    The science,and the preponderance of evidence says that eastern coyotes do hunt in packs,and are capable of killing adult deer-so aq horse isn’t out of the realm of possibility.

    Like

  2. faunahoop says:

    ACTUALLY it was a pack of lies, not a pack of coyotes. Coyotes need a better lawyer, they are always the 1st suspect- most of the time it is domestic dogs, fowl play or disease or accident that do the killing, not coyotes. http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/dnr-does-not-believe-coyotes-took-down-horse-in-oxford-township/31241756#.VN9mrJNZEDU.facebook

    Like

    • gamegetterII says:

      Actually,eastern coyotes do hunt in packs,and they do kill deer,both adult and fawn,and as I have stated-in areas with high coyote populations,fawn predation can be as high as 70%-that’s fact-not lies. The number is from a University of Ga study.
      Here’s some factual info on coyote predation of deer and fawns…
      http://www.gon.com/article.php?id=347
      A study in Georgia amazingly found that it took 78 does to recruit 2 fawns in a predator rich area! Once the predators were removed, it took only 3 does to recruit 2 fawns into the fall herd. Research in Pennsylvania found that in certain mature forest, areas bears are as effective as coyotes as fawn predators.

      Much of the coyote research has looked at fawn survival rates (recruitment rates) before and after eliminating predators from a given area. In one Alabama study where deer numbers were reported to be declining professional trappers removed the predators (mostly coyotes with some bobcats). Fawn survival rates (surviving until fall or recruited into the adult herd at 6 months old) increased dramatically (over 200%) the following year!

      Unfortunately research also indicates that predator eradication is only temporary. In areas where coyotes were “trapped out”, they became well established again after 12-18 months.
      http://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/big-buck-zone/2013/05/deer-management-are-predators-eating-your-fawns
      Even though coyote predation was low in Minnesota farm country, coyotes are a major predator on whitetail fawns. On an island off the coast of Maine where there is no hunting, coyotes were the major fawn predator and mortality there was 74%. In Texas where coyotes abound, a study showed a fawn loss or 72%. The fact that coyotes were the top predator in Pennsylvania is similar to results of other fawn mortality studies. In New Brunswick, coyote predation on fawns was 47%. In Iowa and Illinois, coyote predation rates of fawns was over 50%.
      http://www.knowhunting.com/article.php?id=199
      Though they aren’t indigenous to areas east of the Mississippi River, coyotes now inhabit each of the Lower 48 states. Their ever-expanding range and dietary adaptability are the perfect storm for depredation. Most experts agree that the coyote’s presence has an ill effect on deer populations nationwide, and most studies back up those claims.

      Read more: http://www.petersenshunting.com/deer/whitetail/coyotes-and-deer-can-these-killers-bring-down-mature-bucks/#ixzz3RkLj1zhb
      Though they aren’t indigenous to areas east of the Mississippi River, coyotes now inhabit each of the Lower 48 states. Their ever-expanding range and dietary adaptability are the perfect storm for depredation. Most experts agree that the coyote’s presence has an ill effect on deer populations nationwide, and most studies back up those claims.

      Read more: http://www.petersenshunting.com/deer/whitetail/coyotes-and-deer-can-these-killers-bring-down-mature-bucks/#ixzz3RkLj1zhb
      Though they aren’t indigenous to areas east of the Mississippi River, coyotes now inhabit each of the Lower 48 states. Their ever-expanding range and dietary adaptability are the perfect storm for depredation. Most experts agree that the coyote’s presence has an ill effect on deer populations nationwide, and most studies back up those claims.

      Read more: http://www.petersenshunting.com/deer/whitetail/coyotes-and-deer-can-these-killers-bring-down-mature-bucks/#ixzz3RkLj1zhb

      Like

    • gamegetterII says:

      Actually,no it was not a pack of lies-it is an incident that the DNR’s OPINION of what took place was not due to coyotes.
      The DNR doesn’t know,the horses owners doesn’t know-something killed the horse-My guess is the horse was either sick,or was laying down,because coyotes and wolves tend to avoid horses.
      I’ve lived where there were wolves and coyotes-and never saw,or know anyone who saw either take down a healthy full grown horse. I’ve seen a sheep pen where wolves killed every sheep-but the 2 horses in the same pen were untouched,but that was in Montana,western coyotes and eastern coyotes are not the same.Eastern coyotes hunt in packs at times-western coyotes tend to be solitary,or in pairs.

      Like

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